Trưng Vương (58-65) Diễn Đàn Forum Index Trưng Vương (58-65) Diễn Đàn

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

CHUYỆN VUI BUỒN TRONG ĐỜI DI DÂN
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Trưng Vương (58-65) Diễn Đàn Forum Index -> Bài Viết
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2008 4:32 pm    Post subject: CHUYỆN VUI BUỒN TRONG ĐỜI DI DÂN Reply with quote

Đây là một bài research BH viết hồi mới sang Mỹ (1992)

SUCCESS CAN’T NEVER BE GRANTED

Linh Lan was born to a middle class Vietnamese family. Her parents were her mentors. Her father struggled his whole life for his children’s and beloved relatives’ happiness and education. Her mother was an intellectual and typical Vietnamese woman who devoted her life to her husband and children. Arriving in the States, her mother has been trying to adjust herself to the new society and never give up herself to difficulties. Inherited those virtues, Linh Lan made her way to the new life. Although Linh Lan was an experienced pharmacist in Vietnam for 19 years, being able to practice pharmacy again in the US costs her many years of hardwork, energy, patience, and effort. She is working now as a pharmacist for California State.


PREPARATION

My family had spent more than eight years waiting for an exit permit visa from Vietnamese government to go to the USA. We waited three more years before being interviewed and scheduled for a flight to the Promised Land. Leaving Saigon airport, we landed in Bangkok, Thailand, staying there ten more days for our entry visa. An eighteen-hour flight finally took us to San Francisco airport. Three more hours in front of the INS booth finally ended lead us to a new struggle: survival and achievement in the Land of Freedom and Opportunity.
Back to "the old days” in Vietnam, since we applied for our entry to the USA, we all had been taken English classes at private homes - public English schools were forbidden then. We also went to college or vocational classes for professional skills, therefore can support ourselves when living in the States. At the same time, we had to work to earn our living when waiting for our departure.
Two months before we left Vietnam, my adopted brother's wife came back from the US to visit her family. It was the first time we learned about conflicts between sponsors and their relatives who are newly arrivers. Her detailed stories helped us to understand that differences of the two cultures as well as lacking of information on part of the new comers are causes. Another goal that we were going to reach was trying to avoid or face those conflicts.
Our departure finally scheduled, we sold every thing we could, from waste papers, appliances, our motorcycles, and furniture to our parents’ houses. We save pennies for our future.

SURPRISES!!!

A week after coming to Stockton, we found out that were not got prepared enough. Our family, including my mother and six daughters was a burden to my two sisters who were our sponsors. We did get financial help from US government for our room and board for a short time, but we were expected to support ourselves as soon as possible. Unfortunately, we learned English well in writing and reading, but we hardly understand people in social contacts. We even did not have the surviving skills: looking for different items in supermarkets or department stores, crossing intersections, filling forms, buying cars, signing contracts to utilities companies, especially typing and driving cars. Without those skills, it was lucky if we could get a minimum paid jobs such as janitor, assemblers, or workers on the fields. Looking for jobs was our full-time job, therefore, we hardly had time to take typing and English classes, at public schools, that were mostly on daytime schedule. Attending college was impossible in the first months, we could not afford non-resident tuition and fee that were $108 per units. Taking driver’s lesson was not affordable neither. Besides, even prepared for culture conflicts, we could not avoid them and suffered pretty much in a lot of aspects. We felt depressed and desperate. Our dream of being professional workers seemed never came true.

STRUGGLE

We did not give up!!! It was our family’s value that we would survive in any situation.
Two weeks after we came to Stockton, we attended training courses provided by public organizations. We learned there how to look for job and prepare for interviews. Our daily schedule was tied with morning reporting at the training office, visiting places to apply jobs, taking typing class between job hunting and afternoon report, and driver’s lesson at night. We did not have a lot of chance being interviewed, probably due to our poor English communication skill and working experience in the US. Once, the instructor told me to register at EDD. I came there, filled out their form, and decided I would like to get a clerical position. I thought, had been an assistant manager for more than ten years, I should have made a good clerk. Unfortunately, how could I work as a clerk without typing skill and fluent English. I even failed the clerical test. Then, we continue to drag our days on buses, training centers, and vocational school. That means long wait of half to two hours for the bus in downtown Stockton, running across the street back and forth to avoid drunken passbies, and miles of walking daily under the burning sun of 110 F degree.
Fortunately, at that time, there was a wave of Vietnamese new comers to Stockton, therefore, the need of bilingual instructional assistant increased. With our background of reading and writing English, we all pass the English proficiency test for that position, and of course, the Vietnamese test. Then, there were the chance and challenge of job interviews.
After four months, one of my sisters and I got jobs at two different schools. Four months later, my other three sisters got the same position at other schools. Also, our Pel-Grant was approved, and we started our first semester at San Joaquin Delta College. My youngest sister got a work study job at San Joaquin Delta College. We passed the driver’s test and could share two cars to get to school and work. The rainy days were gone, then began the new challenge: survive our job and education programs to achieve our goal.
During eight months, we all had shared the same experiences, but we started each one's journey for our goal then.

MY FIRST JOB

I started the job in early August. I was assigned to help in two kindergarten classes and a third-grade class. It was a big challenge to me. My school experience in Vietnam was so different to the American school system. Besides, at that time, I still hardly understood what was going on in the classroom, partly because the program is so advanced with a lot of practical projects, mostly because I could not follow the teachers in spoken English. Anyway, the teachers were so understanding that they usually wrote down instructions for me, therefore I got used to the routine soon. Later on, I got more advanced tasks such as teaching Math, Science, and English to the students, from Vietnamese ones to students from other cultures, even groups of American students. In addition to regular schedule in the classroom, I took care of Vietnamese classes and cultural activities in occasional events such as Vietnamese New Year Festival, International Festival... I also attended different workshops for workers who work with bilingual students. Those activities built up my self-esteem pretty well, and the first working days in the US were one of my cherished memories. My first worksite was also likely an elementary school to me there I learned about American culture, organization, as well as English. It was also my shelter, because every one was understanding and supportive to my task as well as my effort to obtain the required qualification of a registered pharmacist.

Education and Exams

As soon as I started my job, I also started my English classes to get prepared for my English tests and pharmacy refresher courses. Getting a pretty good score in the assessment test at the community college, I was placed in a writing class with the students from formal high school. The same problem that I had to face: understanding spoken English. I even missed some assignments due to missing instruction. Again, I had great teachers who understood my problem, supported and encouraged me so much. I got straight As in two semesters with reading and writing classes, and got the required score for the Test of English as Foreign Language(TOEFL). With that score, I was qualified to take the National Equivalency Exam for the Bachelor Degree of Pharmacy. Two years later, I passed the Test of Spoken English (TSE) for foreign graduates required by California Board of Pharmacy. Ten years of learning English in Vietnam, then three semesters at Delta college and three years working at Parklane Elementary School were the precious chances for me to achieve those required English qualifications for pharmacy candidates. Pharmaceutical knowledge is another difficult task that I had to work on.
Nineteen years working in a pharmaceutical factory did not help me much in obtaining new information about pharmacy practice. We didn’t have a system to help pharmacist update their professional knowledge neither. Indeed, after the communist took over the South Vietnam, we were not only behind in information, but also went backward in economic and scientific activities. Everything was getting worse in sixteen years before I left Vietnam with the poor economy, the economic sanction, and the ignorance of the ruling party.
My State Pharmacy Degree was acknowledged when I arrived in the US, but to be qualified to work as a registered pharmacist is different. We were to do all kind of paperwork to get our degree accredited, then take the English tests before taking the pharmacy exams.
After passed the TOEFL, I learned that there were refresher courses offered to foreign pharmacist to get prepared for the Equivalency Exam, called EE. At that time, I still could not follow spoken English very well. The class offered by the Vietnamese Pharmacist Association (VPA) in the USA was held in Orange County, seven hours away from Stockton, and it was pretty hard to get a job there to support myself. The only way to get new pharmacy information for the exam was taking correspondence class. After studying from hand out and cassette tapes for three months, I realized that I was overwhelmed by the totally new information. I could not have taken the exam that year (December 1992) if I did not attend the class in person. I decided to take a non-paid leave of four months before the test to concentrate in studying.
Leaving for Orange County in early September, I turnovered my family little car, just one hour away from Stockton on I-5. The next day, we continued our trip. My brother in law took me there on his car, sat with me when I drove back and forth to school, tried to help me overcome the driving phobia from the accident. Two days later, I drove myself to school, thirty minutes away on highway. I was still panic and was so frightened on the busy highway, but I had no choice. The place I chose to live belonged to an American lady, and I would have had a big chance to practice English as well as learning the culture from her.
At school, all my classmates envied my passing the TOEFL, but I envied their knowledge in pharmacy field, they were eight months ahead of me!
Gratefully, everyone in the class was so friendly and considerate. From three hundred miles away, I was there, no relatives, but feeling as if I was in a big family. They shared their food to me, took me home on Saturday night - the class was held on Saturday and Sunday only - gave me a shelter, and helped explained to me what I could not catch up at school. We studied together, reviewed what was taught at school, and did the quizzes together. Everyone shared their information and helped one another. We booked the air flight to Chicago and hotel room together, then canceled them all, because the National Board of Pharmacy holds the Exam in both Chicago and Los Angeles. Then, we carpooled to Los Angeles for the exam. This time I was the driver for three more people. My phobia was gone without my notice.
Aged ranged from thirties to seventies, everyone had a steady goal: passing the EE. We forty people all passed the exam. That is the tradition of the refresher classes given by the Vietnamese Pharmacist Association. Strong will, working hard, patience of each individual student; cooperation, friendship among the classmates; dedication of the underpaid instructional staff who sacrificed their weekends to help the new comers, were main factors for our success.
Coming back to my job at Parklane school, I then had more things to worry about: earning 1500 hours of internship, passing the TSE (Test of Spoken English), and the CA Board Exam for Licensure while still had to earn my living.
Unlike Orange County, Stockton people almost did not know anything about the foreign pharmacists and their program to become a practicing pharmacist in the US Besides, Stockton also has School of Pharmacy, University of Pacific. Its students, of course, occupied all vacancy of intern positions. Checking with several independent and retail pharmacies, I could not find one that I could volunteer to earn the hours. Desperately, I asked for advice from a UOP student, having no hope that she could help me at all, because we belonged to two separate systems. She gave me the phone number of a public health pharmacy that, to my surprise, greatly welcomed me as a volunteer intern, even I was a second line one. That event made a big turn in my life, because it related seriously to my pharmacy career later.
Getting the position, I gave up 3 hours of my working schedule at the school. That means I would have only half of the already low income that I had and also lost my health insurance. Again, I had no choice, if I wanted to become a registered pharmacist. Furthermore, I had to pay for another class, that enable me to take the California Board Exam for Licensure. The class was also held by the VPA, then I had to travel to Anaheim every weekend for the class. I started a new schedule: teaching at Parklane school in the morning, working in San Joaquin Mental Health Services Pharmacy in the afternoon, English class in the evening, Anaheim class on weekend.
To travel to Anaheim, I usually took a Greyhound bus at 11 p.m. to LA, transferred to another bus and arrived at 8 am in Anaheim. A friend would pick me up and take me to UC Irvine Medical Center for the class. Again, they gave me room and board a whole year, until the earthquake made my trip to Anaheim too difficult, then I had to drop it. My family and some other friends wonderfully supported me mentally and financially to survive that challenging time.
Almost a year after I passed the EE, I passed the TSE, but only could take the NAPLEX exam in 1994. when I completed at least 1,000 intern hours. Passing that one, I still did not feel ready to work as a pharmacist. Another year intern in a hospital, joining a study group in San Jose, and working full time one year at the pharmacy -that I used to volunteer- helped building up my confidence. January 1996, I completed the internship, passed the CA board Exam, then got my first job as pharmacist at the Nevada Mental Health Institute.

Failure

Again, a new page of my life turned. Being a hard worker was not enough, I had to prove to my new work team that I am a competent pharmacist. Unlike my former director at SJMHS pharmacy, who always valued my effort and competency as an intern, my new director expected me to be an experienced pharmacist. The position was pretty challenge to me: I was in charge of the pharmacy operation, both in and outpatient services. Pharmacy staff was short, I was brand new to the system, and not really fluent in English. I was trained on the job by a pharmacy technician, and was the only pharmacist in the pharmacy. I struggled with my task, learned days by days both management skill and professional experience while trying to finish the daily work load that was overwhelmed to the whole staff. My first evaluation was not bad, I was considered a good learner and average pharmacist and supervisor. After six months, I could handle the job, not easily though. Unfortunately, the longer I worked there, the situation was getting worse. The institute applied a new computer system, everything slowed down, and the director could not handle the stress, left us to struggle by ourselves. Patients complained of waiting for their prescriptions for days, sometime yelled at pharmacy staff. Bad management and non-acceptation to suggestion from staff by our director and the institute made all pharmacy staff left except me. Having to train a new pharmacist and two new technicians, I could not finish my daily task. Although the two technicians and I worked one to two extra hours for free every day, we still did not finish the job. Then, there came my second evaluation: I got a pretty bad one. I still made enough score for staying at the job, but the comments did not show any of my achievement. He did mention my efforts, but did not see any improvement from there. I even got a record of the errors including one serious one that I did not make, indeed it was my director’s mistake. Hours of discussions to him did not change the situation. All of my suggestions to help improve my weakness as well as pharmacy services were not approved. I felt totally falling apart, facing a real threat: losing my job in dishonor. I got really sick, could not stand to see him anymore. Since I put my first steps on the American land, I have never been treated so unfairly. I got so much support from most people whom I contacted with that I never mind someone’s attitude toward me. I would thought that was their problem. I still thought that it was his problem in interpersonal relationship, but it affected my life so seriously: my self-esteem lost, my job and professional integrity were threatened. I decided that I had to leave.

ACHIEVEMENT

Yes, I was falling apart, but I did not give up. Again, my family, my new friends that I made in Reno, and my former director who has had high confidence in me were with me through out the hardest time of my life. Besides, good recommendation of my former director and the experience that I learned at the institute made me a competent candidate of pharmacist position at California State Prisons. I got three job offers with better hours.
It has been almost two more years since I left Reno. I am happy with my life now. At work, we make a good team and I am considered a valuable team member. I have had more good friends in the new hometown, and I just passed the test of American naturalization. I still have to learn a lot, English as well as professional skill and new culture, but learning always is my joy, I feel so fulfilled. Our cultural conflict to my Americanized siblings gradually faded as long as we accustomed to the new culture. Looking back to my bad and good experiences as an immigrant, I am proud of my family achievement, and of myself overcoming of all obstacles and reaching my goal. I am so thankful to the mercy that I got: my wonderful and dedicated teachers in English and pharmacy, my family, my friends and my job. Never giving up, keeping struggle and great support were the keys to my success.


Last edited by To Bich Ha on Fri Oct 31, 2008 4:08 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
vutruong



Joined: 08 Aug 2005
Posts: 1931

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BHà ơi, ta đã được đọc bài này từ khi Hà mới viết mà đọc lại vẫn cảm phục lắm, vì cùng ngành, cùng phải " chiến đấu " khi thi lại cũng như đi làm nên đọc thấy thông cảm, thấm thía lắm. Chén nước mắm đủ vị chua cay mặn ngọt thú vị hơn chén nước mắm y hay ly đường ngọt lịm !!!
Bên này thì làm tới nơi rồi chơi tới chốn chứ không tà tà như ở VN . Cô em họ mình nay vẫn là Dược sĩ ở VN nói rằng các chị ngồi máy lạnh suốt ngày, nhân viên làm gần hết trong khi em là chủ tiệm phải ôm mọi việc, trời nắng chang chang phải chạy xe gắn máy đi lấy và giao thuốc, trong khi tiền kiếm cả tháng chưa bằng lương các chị một ngày ! Thôi cứ an phận đi nhỉ .
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dung ơi,
Chúng mình sang đây đứa trước đứa sau, ngành nghề nào cũng thế, đứa nào cũng phải trải qua trôi nổi thăng trầm. Tao nổi hứng post bài này vì bắt chước PK, nhưng lười viết lại. Để từ từ dịch lại sau. Chỉ mừng là vẫn còn đất sống và làm việc, rồi enjoy chí chóe phải không??? Tao khoái câu mi nói về cái miệng toe toét của Sophia. Tiếp tục hí hởn nhé.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Phạm thị Thu



Joined: 25 Mar 2006
Posts: 169
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hà ơi , khi nào rảnh dịch sang tiếng Việt nhé . Cám ơn Hà .
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 11:16 am    Post subject: OK THU ƠI Reply with quote

THU VÀ CÁC BẠN ƠI, CHẮC CHẮN LÀ HÀ PHẢI DỊCH BÀI NÀY RỒI. NHƯNG THÁNG NÀY RẤT BẬN, NÊN RÁNG CHỜ MỘT TÍ NHÉ. CỔ CÓ DÀI MỘT TÍ THÌ TRÔNG SẼ ĐẸP GÁI HƠN, ĐỪNG LA HÀ NHÉ. Wink Wink Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



Linh Lan sinh trưởng từ một gia đình trung lưu và Lan thường coi ba mẹ như những tấm gương sáng để noi theo. Ba Lan đã tận tụy hy sinh cả cuộc đời của ông cho hạnh phúc và học vấn của đàn con và cả thân bằng quyến thuộc. Bất hạnh thay, ông đã qua đời trong một trại cải tạo tập trung, không được gặp vợ con lần chót trước lúc lâm chung. Mẹ Lan là tiêu biểu của một phụ nữ Việt Nam, tận tụy với chồng con. Từ khi đặt chân lên đất Mỹ, bà luôn luôn cố gắng hội nhập vào xã hội mới, và không bao giờ nản lòng trước mọi khó khăn.

Thừa hưởng truyền thống tốt đẹp của bố mẹ, Lan cũng quyết tâm tạo dựng cuộc sống mới cho riêng mình. Mặc dù đã hành nghề dược sĩ ở Việt Nam trong 19 năm, Lan cũng phải vất vả bao năm để được phép trở lại nghề dược trên đất Mỹ. Cuối cùng, thì Lan cũng cầm mảnh giấy phép hành nghề ở California và đang có một việc làm khá tốt.


Sau đây là lời tự thuật của Lan:

Gia đình tôi đã chờ đợi cả 8 năm mới được cấp giấy phép xuất cảnh. 3 năm sau, chúng tôi mới được phỏng vấn và lên danh sách chuyến bay để đến miền Đất hứa. Rời phi trường Tân Sơn Nhất, chúng tôi đáp xuống phi trường Bancok, phải ở lại đó thêm 10 ngày nữa để chờ làm thủ túc nhập cảnh Mỹ. Cuối cùng một chuyến bay dài 18 tiếng đồng hồ và 3 giờ chờ đợi trước quầy làm việc của INS trong phi trường San Francisco đã chấm dứt. Một cuộc tranh đấu sống còn cho những ngày tới đang chờ đợi chúng tôi. Làm sao để vượt mọi khó khăn về ngôn ngữ và thành công trên mảnh đất Tự Do và đầy hứa hẹn này
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Thu Oct 09, 2008 2:25 pm    Post subject: Chuẩn bị Reply with quote

Trở lại những ngày "xa xưa" ở Việt Nam, từ khi bắt đầu nộp đơn xin xuất cảnh, toàn thể gia đình chúng tôi đều cần cù sách cặp đến các lớp Anh văn tại gia để rèn luyện Anh ngữ. Lúc đó, năm 1981, các trường Anh ngữ tư nhân đều bị đóng cửa. Ban ngày, chúng tôi vẫn tiếp tục đi làm toàn thời gian trong khi chờ đợi một viễn ảnh của ngày xuất cạn không biết bao giờ sẽ đến. Buổi tối, ngoài lớp Anh Văn, các em tôi còn đi học thêm các nghề tay trái để chuẩn bị tự lập khi đến Mỹ. Hai tháng trước khi chúng tôi rời Việt Nam, chị dâu, vợ anh nuôi tôi từ Mỹ về thăm quê hương. Trước đây, chỉ biết mơ ước và mong mỏi đến ngày sang Mỹ, khi chị ấy về, lần đầu tiên chúng tôi mới nghe nói về những mâu thuẫn giữa người bảo lãnh và thân nhân mới sang. Những câu chuyện rất chi tiết của chị giúp chúng tôi hiểu sự khác biệt giữa hai nền văn hóa, cũng như sự kém chuẩn bị của những người mới sang là nguyên nhân chính của mọi mâu thuẫn. Chuyến viếng thăm của chị đã đem đến cho chúng tôi một mục tiêu nữa: làm sao tránh được những đụng chạm, dù vô tình với các em tôi, những người đã hết lòng hết sức lo lắng, ân cần, làm đủ mọi thủ tục để đem chúng tôi sang đây, và mong mỏi chờ đợi chúng tôi từng ngày từng giờ.

Ngày khởi hành cuối cùng cũng đến, chúng tôi hối hả bán tống bán tháo tất cả cái gia sản nhỏ nhoi còn lại sau 16 năm sống với CS. Từ những mảnh giấy học trò cất giữ trong bao năm học, các giấy tờ, chứng từ buôn bán của ba tôi, chổi cùn dế rách, đồ đạc tạp lục, xe cộ, đồ gỗ trang trí nội thất mà ba tôi đã đặc biệt làm riêng cho gia đình dùng, và quan trọng nhất là ngôi nhà ba má tôi đã tự tay gây dựng, ngôi nhà với bao ký niệm của một thời phồn thịnh trong công việc làm ăn của ba, và là nơi chúng tôi đã sống những ngày thật hạnh phúc trong suốt hơn 20 năm trời. Chúng tôi thật sự góp nhặt từng xu một cho những ngày đầu tiên trên xứ lạ quê người.


Last edited by To Bich Ha on Tue Oct 14, 2008 12:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 12:25 pm    Post subject: Bât Ngờ Reply with quote

Đặt chân lên Stockton được một tuần, chúng tôi khám phá ra rằng sự chuẩn bị kỹ càng của chúng tôi trước khi đi vẫn chưa đủ. Bẩy mẹ con chúng tôi thật sự là một gánh nặng đối với hai cô em. Chúng tôi tạm thời được trợ cấp của chính phủ trong một thời gian ngắn, nhưng họ cũng muốn chúng tôi tự lập càng sớm càng tốt. Trớ trêu thay, vốn Anh Ngữ của chúng tôi chỉ giúp chúng tôi viết và đọc, còn nói chuyện thẳng với người Mỹ thật là một ác mộng.

Trong xã hội mới, chúng tôi thật sự như Mán về thành, vào chợ thì mắt nhớn nhác không biết tìm hàng hóa ở quầy nào, sang đường thì mắt trươ'c mắt sau, lúc nào cũng thấy bàn tay đỏ lòm dơ vào mặt, mặc dù đèn phía mình vẫn xanh. Thậm chí, ngày đầu tập lái xe, thấy đèn xanh là mừng húm, rẽ trái tức thì, trong khi đó là đèn đi thẳng (thị Ngố II không biết bên này có lane và đèn hiệu quẹo trái riêng) Điền giấy tờ, ký hợp đồng thuê nhà, đi mua xe, nhất nhất đều phải nhờ vợ chồng cô em chỉ bảo hay làm dùm. Lúc đó, dù có muốn tìm một công việc với lương tối thiểu như đi lau chùi nhà, làm công nhân dây chuyền, hay làm việc đồng áng cũng không phải là dễ.

Để tiếp tục được hưởng trợ cấp tạm, chúng tôi phải dành hết thời giờ ban ngày để tham dự lợp huấn luyện và đi tìm việc làm. Vì vậy, không biết làm sao mà đi tập đánh máy hay học thêm Anh văn. Đa số các lớp này đều được dạy ban ngày. Trong những tháng đầu, chúng tôi cũng không thể đặt chân đến college để học vì chúng tôi chưa phải là thường trú nhân, phải trả học phí hơn $100 một unit mà mỗi lớp học là tối thiểu 3 units (resident chỉ trả $12 một unit thôi) Học phí để học lái xe cũng rất tốn kém, nhất là trợ cấp của chúng tôi chỉ vừa đủ để trả tiền nhà, điện nước, và đi chợ. Một vấn đề nan giải mà chúng tôi phải đương đầu là sự mâu thuẫn không tránh khỏi giữa hai nền văn hóa. Chúng tôi thật rất chán nản và tuyệt vọng. Giấc mộng trở thành những chuyên viên trong nghành nghề chúng tôi yêu thích dường như chỉ là bình sữa của cô Bê Rét



Last edited by To Bich Ha on Wed Oct 22, 2008 4:35 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
phuongkhanh



Joined: 12 Sep 2006
Posts: 2314

PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2008 8:46 pm    Post subject: Nhắn BH! Reply with quote

Hà ơi, tiếp tục dịch đi nhé, ngày nào PK cũng vào đây đọc bài của Hà đấy, tuy không thấy ai có "ý kiến gì " vì không ai muốn ngắt lời của Hà, nhưng Hà có để ý con số "bạn đọc "nhảy vọt lên cao lắm không?
Mình rất bội phục gia đình Hà từ Má đến các chị em Hà, bước đầu chân ướt chân ráo tới Mỹ cũng như mọi người đều phải làm lại từ đầu, vậy mà phấn đấu vượt bực, được như ngày nay.
Nên rất thích thú theo dõi bài này của Hà.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 3:52 pm    Post subject: "PHẤN ĐẤU" Reply with quote

Chúng tôi thật không thể bỏ cuộc. Truyền thống của gia đình tôi là phải tồn tại trong mọi tình huống khó khăn.
2 tuần sau khi đến Stockton, chúng tôi bắt đầu tham dự những lớp hướng dẫn tìm việc làm của những tổ chức thiện nguyện trong tỉnh.
Các huấn luyện viên chỉ dẫn chúng tôi phương cách tìm việc làm, và chuẩn bị cho các buổi phỏng vấn. Thời khóa biểu hàng ngày của chúng tôi thật bận rộn; sáng ra lếch thếch kéo nhau đi 2 chuyến xe bus đến lớp huấn luyện rồi đi đây đó nộp đơn xin việc, trưa về nhà ăn vội bữa cơm, xong lén đi tập đánh máy ở lớp huấn nghệ miễn phí, chiều lại phải đến lớp trình diện, tối thì về học lái xe. Tôi là chị lớn nên được ưu tiên học trước.
Rất hiếm khi chúng tôi được các nơi cần người phỏng vấn. Có lẽ vì họ đọc lý lịch (resume) thấy chúng tôi mới sang, chắc Anh ngữ không thông hoặc vì thiếu kinh nghiệm làm việc ở Mỹ.

Một hôm, huấn luyện viên (HLV) dẫn tôi đi nộp đơn ở EDD (Bộ Thất Nghiệp) Trả lời câu hỏi "Công việc nào thích hợp với bạn?" tôi tự nghĩ; "Hồi đó mình làm dược sĩ, Phụ Tá Quản Đốc cả 17 năm, có thư ký riêng, thì nay, mình nên xuống một cấp, làm thư ký đi, chắc là làm việc không tệ đâu." bèn hùng dũng điền vào: "Clerical position"
Tiếp viên hỏi; "Bà có biết đánh máy không, bao nhiêu chữ một phút?" Trả lời; "Tôi đang tập" Cô ta hỏi tôi; "Thế tại sao bà lại nghĩ là bà có thể làm thư ký hành chánh?"
Trả lời; Surprised Surprised Sad Shocked Thậm chí khi đi thi thử cũng rớt thê thảm. Họ hỏi; "Janitor (lao công quét dọn) nên xếp vào loại gì? Hành chánh hay lao động?" Không biết trả lời vì không biết Janitor và Classified nghĩa là gì, etc ...

Thế là hàng ngày chúng tôi cứ lê lết theo xe bus, hết đến trung tâm tìm việc lại lớp huấn nghệ. Lúc đó là giữa mùa hè ở Stockton, nhiệt độ ngoài trời lên đến hơn 100 độ F, có hôm trên 110 độ. Chúng tôi thường phải đợi xe bus về nhà vào lúc 4 giờ chiều, lúc nóng nhất trong ngày. Thường đợi độ 30 phút thì có xe, nhưng đôi khi xe hư, hay không có tài xế, đợi cả 2 tiếng mới có xe về. Lớp huấn luyện thì ở downtown, đứng ngoài đường nắng cháy mặt, và phải mắt trước mắt sau canh chừng có người say rượu hay có vẻ dân trộm cắp đến gần thì 6 chị em lại dắt nhau chạy sang bên kia đường để trốn, có khi vì vậy mà trễ xe, lại phải đợi chuyến sau. Có hôm học đánh máy xong, đợi xe không kịp giờ trình diện buổi chiều thì lại lết bộ độ 3 cây số trong ánh nắng chói chang về lớp huấn luyện. Mới sang, không biết phong tục bên này, chúng tôi cứ giương mấy cái ô đen to tướng lên để che nắng, đi qua Toà án, thấy có một ông ăn mặc chỉnh tề nói; "Mấy cô can đảm qúa!!!" Chúng tôi sung sướng cười toe toét vì nghĩ là ông ấy khen mình can đảm dám đi bộ trời nắng. Vài hôm sau, cũng mấy cái ô đó theo chúng tôi đi qua trường Cao Đẳng (hay Trung Cấp?) (Delta Community College) , một đám sinh viên ngồi trên bãi cỏ bèn cười hô hố lên khi thấy chúng tôi. Mấy chi em đoán là họ cười mình, nhưng vẫn không biết tại sao? Mãi về sau, mới khám phá ra là ở Mỹ họ chỉ che ô đen, va`ngay cả dù màu, khi trời mưa, còn trời nắng họ chỉ để đầu trần, đội visor hay casquette thôi.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
phuongkhanh



Joined: 12 Sep 2006
Posts: 2314

PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 11:05 am    Post subject: Che ô! Reply with quote

Mình mới qua cũng che dù đi lúc trời nắng như Hà Laughing Laughing Laughing

Nghĩ lại tụi mình tức cười nhỉ? Uổng quá, lúc ấy không có cái ảnh nào???Hồi đó bác lết bết cuốc bộ, còn mình thì vẫn cuốc bộ dài dài cho tới bây giờ để đón tram, métro, bus Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
To Bich Ha



Joined: 07 Aug 2005
Posts: 155
Location: Stockton

PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 4:46 pm    Post subject: Đi xe bus Reply with quote

Khanh ơi, bên Pháp, Âu Châu và các thành phố lớn đi xe bus hay subway dễ và tiện, lại bớt ô nhiễm, khỏi mua xăng, khỏi trả insurance, khỏi sửa xe, sướng hơn Khanh ạ. Tại Hà ở cái tỉnh khỉ ho cò gáy này, 30 phút hay 1 giờ mới có 1 chuyến xe bus, nên ai cũng phải lái xe cho đỡ mất thì giờ . Nhập gia tùy tục chứ Khạnh Hà vẫn ức khi họ mình cười mình che dù. Laughing Laughing Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kimoanh



Joined: 14 Aug 2005
Posts: 1182

PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BH oi, ngay moi qua My, ra duong luc troi nang, minh cung che du nhu BH day.
Co lan di pho cung chi ban hang xom, chi nay qua truoc minh 9 thang, hai dua nam tay nhau di, gap nguoi quen, ho dan cung phai di chung dung nam tay nhau, moi nguoi se nghi hai nguoi...
Nhieu chuyen buon cuoi ma minh khong biet vi phong tuc, tap quan Dong, Tay khac nhau BH va cac ban nhi?
Cuoc doi cua nguoi Di dan co nhieu canh ngo giong nhau. Bay gio BH , Ma va cac em cua BH da thanh cong tren xu nay roi, nghi lai nhung ngay cu de nhac lai ky niem vui thoi BH nhi?
KO
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hoanghac
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 12:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nghe Ha` nói mình biết là họ che dù trời mưa thôi! well, ngay cả bây giờ khi đi chụp hình, tớ vẫn lôi dù ra che nắng, che cho máy hình, đứa nào cười hở mười cái răng, tớ cóc ngán và sẽ "dạy" chúng tí ti về chuyện cây dù, nhưng không có ai cười cả Hà ạ. Lucky chăng?

HD
Back to top
Danha



Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 133
Location: Taxas

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HD ơi, như vậy chúng mình là đồng minh rồi . Bến xe bus mình đợi mỗi ngày không có mái che. Cứ tưởng tượng nắng Texas lúc 5 giờ chiều.... Hôm nào nắng và nóng là mình đều che dù, kết quả là bây giờ có mấy bà đợi bus cũng che dù như mình . Thế là dù xanh, dù đỏ, dù vàng... new fashion at the bus stop Laughing Laughing

ĐHà
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Trưng Vương (58-65) Diễn Đàn Forum Index -> Bài Viết All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group